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Technovation Challenge Curriculum

This 10-part curriculum is designed to engage high-school girls in entrepreneurship and programming. The first five sessions focus on specific concepts and "hacks" or tutorial walk-throughs, while the last five sessions are dedicated to designing and building an App for the final "pitch night" competition.

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Combination Curriculum of Robotics and Mobile Phone in Primary Education Level with Graphical Programming Environment

Robots have proved effective in support of play-based teaching activities, especially at the primary education level. With the rapid improvement of the smart phone, we found many useful functions which robots can benefit from smart phones. ... [The authors] briefly discuss about the combination of robots and mobile phone applications in primary Education Level and as well how graphical programming environment is employed to improve students’ learning performance.

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  • Curriculum

I Love My Smartphone: Mobile App Development V2

This curriculum is part of a new series of Computer Science curricula for the Scottish education system. Aimed at students in middle and high school, this material provides a course in programming for mobile devices, and it explores new paradigms in Computing such as mobile technologies and new interfaces, whilst providing ample opportunity for inter-disciplinary linkage. Exercises are provided with sample answers and there are many additional activities which can be used to both broaden and deepen the topic. The materials offer suggestions for fostering computational thinking and making learning more engaging for students.

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Inventing Mobile Apps, Taught by Lyn Turbak at Wellesley College

This course teaches how to create apps for mobile devices as a vehicle for learning big ideas of computer science, engineering, and entrepreneurship and explore technology's impact on society. Applications include games, quizzes, electronic voting, location-aware apps, social networking, and apps that communicate with web services. All apps will be created on Android phones using App Inventor, a visual programming environment that does not require previous programming experience. The course culminates in a project where students design and implement new mobile apps for clients.

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Computing with Mobile Phones, Taught by Ralph Morelli at Trinity College

In this course, students learned how to access the world of mobile services and applications as creators, not just consumers. They will learn to create entertaining and socially useful apps that can be shared with friends and family. In addition to learning to program and how to become better problem solvers, students will also explore the exciting world of computer science from the perspective of mobile computing and its increasingly important effect on society. This course is similar to and borrows from Dave Wolber’s course. Lectures and homework assignments are mapped to the App Inventor book. Students maintain portfolios of their work. In addition, it is one of several CS Principles pilot courses and maps the course materials to the CS Principles curriculum.

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Building Mobile Applications, Taught by Hal Abelson at MIT

Three years ago, it was rare for non-professionals to implement mobile applications. Even two years ago, building a working app was an intensive semester-long project. Today, implementing a mobile app can be a straightforward exercise. The challenge is to have good ideas for what to build. This course, taught by Hal Abelson at MIT in the fall of 2011, deals with how to pick project ideas and rapidly bring them to fruition through the prototype phase, how work as part of an effective rapid development team, and how to present your work in a compelling way.

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App Inventor Course in a Box: Modular Intro CS course by David Wolber (USF)

Teaching a course on App Inventor? This site provides a framework for doing so. David Wolber from the University of San Francisco has taught introductory CS for non-majors (CS0), but the materials could be adapted for a CS1 course for majors as well, or for a high school course. You can also pick and choose from the seven available modules, or just give a two or three week intro to App Inventor with the introductory modules.

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  • Curriculum

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